Motorcycle Hall of Fame

hallWHERE HEROES LIVE ON

Created in 1982 by the American Motorcycle Heritage Foundation, the goal of the Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum is to tell the stories and preserve the history of motorcycling.

The Motorcycle Hall of Fame Museum recognizes individuals who have made significant contributions to motorcycling, including those known for their contributions to road riding, off-road riding and racing, as well as those who have excelled in business, history, design and engineering. The Hall of Fame also recognizes classic motorcycles that have made an impact in style, design and innovation from the 1894 Roper Steamer to Chad Reed’s 2004 YZ250.

For me riding is not a hobby, it is not a pastime, it is not a weekend thing to do. It is my life, I need it to survive, so it is only logical that I would find the Motorcycle Hall of Fame interesting. Over the past several years I have written columns about many of the hall of fame members. As you might imagine some of the Hall of Fames inductees would include William Harley, the Davidson brothers, Steve McQueen who was inducted in 1999, David Mann was inducted in 2004 “the year he passed away,” Al Crocker and Glenn Curtis were both inducted in 1998 in the design and engineering category. One of my favorite inductee’s is Senator Dave Zein because he is best known for defending motorcyclists’ rights while serving in the Wisconsin Legislature. But he also rode his 1991 Harley-Davidson Sport Glide more than 1 million miles.

It wouldn’t be a hall of fame for motorcycles without mentioning one of the more notable classic bikes. My all-time favorite would be the 1936 EL knucklehead. The engineering required to create this bike was impressive. The old side-valve design was replaced with the first overhead valves to appear on a production Harley V-twin, an idea taken from aircraft engines.

The result was a simple, reliable powerplant that produced a claimed 40 horsepower. But when it was released in 1936, it was the appearance of the new engine that attracted attention. The prominent rocker boxes, looking like knuckles on a fist, quickly earned the engine the nickname of the “Knucklehead.”

 

Trivia Question of the Month:

QUESTION:  What was the first year that a black leather Harley Davidson Motorcycle Jacket is advertised in the H-D catalog?

 

Answer to last month’s trivia question:

 

QUESTION: What motorcycle company used a front end that they called the “Girdraulic front fork.”

Answer:  “Girdraulic” front fork – which were girder forks with hydraulic damping on a Vincent Black Shadow

 

Bo’s Monthly Words of Wisdom:

“Silence is Golden, but Duct tape is Silver”

 

UNTIL NEXT MONTH
“Live to Ride or Step Aside”

Written by Bo
“The Hog Shoppe”