Facts and Trivia April 2017

There have been literally hundreds of motorcycle manufacturers since the early 1900s, many have contributed to the evolution of today’s modern motorcycles, machines from America, England, Germany, France and Italy.

From 1902, until his death, it is undisputable that Glen Curtiss was a major player, not only in the motorcycle industry, but also in the aviation industry. He was the founder of the “Curtiss aeroplane and Motor Company,” where he made many major contributions in the aircraft industry.

Prior to that Curtiss started his motorcycle company in 1902 and quickly became “Indians” only real competition on the racing circuit until Harley came along.

The first Curtiss motorcycles had single cylinder engines like most of the manufacturers of the time; however, he introduced his first 42 ci. V-twin motor in 1904, 5 years before Harley and 1 year after Indian, but it was the Curtiss V-twin that set the land speed record. Curtiss was also the first to introduce twist grip controls.

It became obvious that Glen Curtiss would not be satisfied with a V-twin when in 1907 he manufactured the famous “Curtiss V-8” motorcycle with direct shaft drive, (pictured below) which was claimed to run at 136mph that year. During one race his V-8 was so powerful the engine torque twisted the frame. It’s amazing to think that Curtiss built motorcycles that had more power than the cars of the day. He was not afraid to innovate and invent. In 1909, the same year Harley introduced their first V-twin, Curtiss introduced the first Triple with a massive capacity of over 100ci. This belt driven monster was mounted on a rigid frame with braced forks.

By 1912, Curtiss probably felt that he did all he could do in the motorcycle industry and could not build a bigger engine that would be practical for the frames of the times. That is when he turned his attention to the aviation industry where he went on to build aircraft with massively powerful engines. He worked on aircraft innovation up until his death in 1930, which was due to complications from an appendectomy.


Trivia Question of the Month:

Question: in 1952 you could buy an FL Panhead, an FLF Panhead or an FLS Panhead. What were the differences?

If you think you have the answer, email “Bo” at Hogshoppe@aol.com
Look for the answer in next month’s issue of
“Full Throttle Magazine.

Answer to last month’s trivia question:

Question: How did the Hydra-Glide acquire its name, why was it changed to Duo-Glide and then to Electra-Glide?

Answer: In 1949 the Springer front end is replaced with a Hydraulic fork system on E and F models, the new front end is called Hydra-Glide. In 1958 the rigid frame is replaced with rear shocks, this gives the big twin dual suspension, the big twins are now called Duo-glides, In 1965 the 6 volt system is changed over to 12 volt with electric start, the big twins are now called Electra-Glides.

 

Bo’s Monthly Words of Wisdom:

Do you want to make money on Facebook, It’s easy. Just go to your account settings, deactivate your account and GET A JOB!

UNTIL NEXT MONTH
“Live to Ride or Step Aside”

Written by Bo
“The Hog Shoppe Inc.”

 

 

 

 

Answer to last month’s trivia question:

Question: How did the Hydra-Glide acquire its name, why was it changed to Duo-Glide and then to Electra-Glide?

 

Answer: In 1949 the Springer front end is replaced with a Hydraulic fork system on E and F models, the new front end is called Hydra-Glide. In 1958 the rigid frame is replaced with rear shocks, this gives the big twin dual suspension, the big twins are now called Duo-glides, In 1965 the 6 volt system is changed over to 12 volt with electric start, the big twins are now called Electra-Glides.

 

Bo’s Monthly Words of Wisdom:

Do you want to make money on Facebook, It’s easy. Just go to your account settings, deactivate your account and GET A JOB!

UNTIL NEXT MONTH
“Live to Ride or Step Aside”

Written by Bo
“The Hog Shoppe Inc.”

Leave a Reply